Question - Patellar Femoral Syndrome (hip exercises)

by Tania
(St. Catharines, Ontario)

I am a 40 year old woman who has developed patellar femoral syndrome. I had been very active and worked out diligently with weights 4to5 days / week until my body collapsed last august of 2007. (I suffered minor thoracic and lumbar pain and overtime developed this syndrome).


I have sought help from physiotherapists and sport medicine doctors and my progress is improving slowly but surely. My question in regards to your article is what sort of exercises can I do to improve my hip strength and control my femur so that I can keep this syndrome at bay?

Follow Up
I neglected to inquire whether doing weight bearing (or non- weight bearing) squats and lunges would be beneficial or harmful to an individual with this syndrome?

In the past, those two WEIGHT BEARING exercises were my favorites to enhance the look of my butt and simply, I miss doing them!!!! However I respect the fact that I do have this syndrome and if I am unable to do them so be it.

I believe that if I were to rate my symptoms it would be rated as moderate to stemming on serious.
Thank you

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Jun 01, 2008
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Lunges and Squats are great
by: Bart - SII

It sounds like you are on your way to a good recovery although it will take some time, as you already indicated. Keep up with the rehabilitation and you should do well.

Weightbearing lunges and squats are both great exercises to work on improving hip strength and alleviating patella femoral syndrome through femoral control. The keys to these two exercises are to make sure that they are not increasing your knee pain when you are doing them. There are lots of ways to "tweak" these two exercises to keep them from causing pain. You can limit how deep you go down with the lunge or squat, you can hold weights or do them without. Focus on your form and try to keep them relatively pain free.

As for other exercises for the hips to treat patella femoral pain - this is an area that I hope to have a lot more information on in the near future, however, my day job of treating patients often gets in the way of being able to add content to the website. This information is in the future plans of SII, but I just haven't been able to get to it just yet.

In the meantime, talk to your therapists about what you can do to increase your hip strength, especially your abductors and external rotators - and try to focus on weightbearing exercises primarily, as this is when those muscles work during activities.

Hope this helps - comment back with other questions.

Jul 09, 2008
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patellar chonromalacia
by: Tania Benoit

I have written to you a few weeks ago in regards to a syndrome that I was told I had (Patellar Femoral Syndrome). However, just today, I was examined by a highly reputable sports specialist by the name of Dr. A. Galea located in Mississauga Ontario who says that I specifically have Patellar Chondromalacia.
Although I trust him and will be under his guidance, I still would like to know from you, if there are specific stretches and strengthening exercises that I should do, now that I have this particular condition. I have followed most everything that you suggested in the article about Patellar Femoral Syndrome (in terms of the specific stretches, balance and strengthening exercises) but now that I know precisely what I have, should I continue to do this? Presently my doctor advises me to spin 6 hours a week (he has shown me the proper form and to work at a 80 rpm level) to continue pilates, the reformer and using lower weighted activities. Hopefully I will see him in 2 weeks for further instruction.
I look forward to hearing your response since I also find your information very interesting and insightful.
Thank you very much for your time.
Tania


Jul 10, 2008
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The hip and core exercises are still important...
by: Bart - SII

Good to hear from you again Tania. I hope you are still doing well.

If you were my patient, I would continue to have you work on the exercises to improve hip mobility and hip / core strength. Patella chondromalacia is a result of your patella femoral syndrome. It is a softening of the articular cartilage on the undersurface of the patella, and it is caused by the abnormal stresses on the cartilage that occur with patella femoral syndrome.

So, in order to alleviate those stresses and to relieve the articular cartilage, control of the femur and good hip strength / mobility is essential.

I am glad that you have found the information on Sports Injury Info interesting and I hope that it has helped you - but please do make sure that you discuss anything you are doing with your doctor, since you are under his care. I hope that he is also a believer in the necessity of strengthening the hips - that is the key to recovering from this injury.

Spinning should be a good activity that will allow for strengthening of the quads (and hips if you do much out of the saddle), and pilates can be very beneficial for the core and improving flexibility. Again, I hope to have more specific info on hip exercises for PFS on the site soon, so keep checking back.

Good luck with your recovery, and please do post any other questions you have!

Jul 13, 2008
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spin bike vs. recumbant bikes
by: Tania Benoit

Bart: I just spent 5 minutes writing to you and something went wrong with my computer, so here I go again.
Thank you very much for your response to my question. I always look forward to hearing from you and even though I don't know you, I feel that you are a genuine individual who sincerely wants to help people get off the sidelines quickly - Thank you!
I have 2 questions for you in regards to chondromalacia. First, as you know my doctor advised me to spin 6 hours/week. Is there a difference between spin bikes and recumbant bikes? I am concerned that my thoracic and lumbar will be affected by spinning since my back will not be protected. Presently, I am receiving chiropractic care but I have not yet fully recovered. My physiotherapist has always suggested the recumbant bike (for back protection) and my new doctor mentions spinning. I am no longer seeing this particular physiotherapist and unfortunately will not be visiting this new doctor for awhile. What do you suggest?
My second question is because I suffer from chondromalacia, is hip and core strengthening exercises a lifetime commitment? Do I need to perform them daily? And years from now, will my knees be severely affected by this condition?
I know that I am asking loads of questions, but honestly, I feel better when you respond.
Once again I thank you for your time.
Tania

Jul 05, 2015
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hip exercises NEW
by: Jacob

I think that yoga is the best hip exercise. I do yoga regularly I don't have any pain in hip. I have read an article about hip exercise in assignment help before.

Oct 07, 2015
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Oct 08, 2015
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