Returning to Running after Parial Meniscus Removal

by Mark
(Sydney)

At 32 and after 20 years of running (x country and track) I only recently had a partial meniscus removal in the left knee. Post operation the Doctor told me no road running, however that I could play football matches, so long as I did not train, and take part in other sports.


My physio, stated, without wanting to override the Surgeons advise, that the Doc/Surgeon is not looking at the big picture and only advising you as what is best for your knee - and advised that it should be possible for me after rehab to run once or twice a week on grass.

I have returned to running about 35-45k (quality) a week and substitute the remaining mileage/kms with Cross Training and Weight training etc....with all running being on grass, bar the odd 5k road race and my track sessions on tartan.

Am i asking for trouble down the line? My Knee feels fine, no bothers no issues - 10 months since the op. Physically I am a lean 6ft 4 and only weight 80kg, and work on strength on the knee to help out on impact.

My lifestyle takes a dramatic swing when I am not focused on Athletics and thus am at the best state of mind when I continue to exercise and race. Thus don't want to quit!

I was also contemplating having a damage assessment done after a couple of years training to see if this could determine the impact that my continued running is having - is this possible?? so that I could re assess development of any longer term damage at a later stage?

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Sep 17, 2008
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Was there other damage?
by: Bart - SII

I would probably agree with your physio - for someone like you who is healthy, in shape, young, and very motivated to stay fit and keep exercising, sensible running shouldn't be something that you give up.

You do sound like you are being sensible - not too many miles, running mostly on grass surfaces, resting between running days, strength training, etc. All of these things will help you avoid overuse injuries and future problems.

With a partial meniscus removal, your knee does lose some shock absorbing ability - which means that the articular surfaces then take a bit more stress - over time this will lead to degeneration of the joint surfaces - and when I say time, I mean decades, not months. You will likely have some arthritis in your knees when you reach 60 or 70 years old, perhaps a bit sooner.

The only caveat I put on this is whether or not there was other damage in the knee that was found during your arthroscopy - did your doctor mention any chondromalacia or roughening/degeneration of the articular surfaces, or other damage? Also, how much of the meniscus did you end up losing? These are not deterrents, but can be indicators of long term prognosis for your knees.

All in all, if you stay sensible with your activities, you should be able to enjoy running for many more years.

Bart

Aug 26, 2009
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Menaflex Procedure
by: Mark

Hello Mark,

My name is also Mark. I also had a partial
menisectomy in my right knee over a year ago.
I commend you for being dedicated to exercising
the knee. I don't know the amount of meniscus
you lost. But I wish to make you aware of an
FDA approved surgical procedure (Menaflex) to
treat medial meniscus injuries. I am sure you
know that the medial meniscus is in the inner
part of the knee. If your meniscal loss was in
the inner area, you may want to view the following websites: www.regenbio.com &
www.menaflex.com This surgical procedure was
FDA approved in Dec 2008. To date there have
been 111 U.S. surgeons to be trained to perform
the surgery. Another website to check is
www.stoneclinic.com to read the info Dr. Kevin Stone (inventor of Menaflex in 1986) says about this procedure. In summary, it is designed
to regrow portions of the medial meniscus. According to Dr. Stone, there were clinical
trials in the U.S. a number of years ago with
successful results as well as successful results in Europe (3000 patients in Europe have had the surgery).

Best of luck,

Mark

Oct 24, 2009
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right knee meniscus
by: Gary

I recently had part of my right knee meniscus removed, the dr said it was torn, so he rmoved a fair bit of it, whn i asked after 2 weeks from the op when i could return to football he said to wait 3-4 months, but didnt fill me with confidence. i am 24 and about 6ft 2 i weigh about 14.5 stone, i would like someones advice on wether i will be able to continue my footballing career as i was moving up levels in my local leagues, and there was a mention of being paid to play, not just about the money but looking forward to playing a much higher level. currently i am putting on weight which is difficult to know how i can exercise to help this. anyone with any posotive responses is very much welcomed, thanks Gary

Oct 29, 2009
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great info
by: cathaleen

I had most of my left knee meniscus removal without being told! Surgery was for a torn meniscus, so I was devastated to have it almost completely removed. I was a marathon runner and did not experience any knee problems before. I should have investigated more thoroughly but never dreamed of this happening. Like you, I need to be active for my mind first, then body. I only started running at age 40 and am 50 now. Was told no more running! Cant do but its fustrating that theres not much out there. Got some get info from the other Mark and will pursue that. Right now I have turned to triathalons but my love is running! Thanks so much for sharing your story, felt alone and depressed since it happened may 2008. Now I have some hope and info, good luck to you also. Not knowing how much to do is a hard place to be!

Nov 17, 2009
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Medial Meniscus Removal, 5 Years in
by: Steve

Hi Mark,

Just wanted to share my experience. I had a complete medial meniscus removal about 5 years ago (in my 20's at that time), and was told by Dr's / Therapists that I could continue my lifesyle without any problems for quite some time. After recovery I used running / hiking as my primary form of exercise. I did not feel any pain whatsoever for about 4 years and then all of a sudden I started getting a very acute pain due to severe arthritis development in my medial side that limited me to a fast walk (anything more causes a great deal of pain). Now considering a partial knee replacement to at least get back to being able to be somewhat active. Although I do find the other Mark's comment intriguing about collagen meniscus implants. Don't mean to scare you but just wanted to share my story.

Nov 20, 2009
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Cycling is a great substitute
by: Oliver

I've had two skiing accidents resulting in removal of part of my medial meniscus and loose/degenerated ligaments. Though I love running and hiking in the mountains, there is no denying that running will result in arthritis sooner or later over time. I do run 1-2 times a week, but I found that cycling is a great alternative (at least for me). With running I do get pain as soon as I push the volume or pace. With cycling it's the opposite, the more I ride, the better me knee feels. Cycling is great because it regenerates the tissue in the knee, strengthens vital muscles without putting much pressure on the meniscus, and is also in many ways more fun than running. I would recommend for beginners to get a good bike fit by an expert, as almost all cycling injuries are related to a bad fit.

Jan 23, 2010
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Left & Right Complete Medial Meniscus Removal
by: Justin

I'm glad to find this thread. I had my right medial meniscus completely removed when I was 21 due to a major tear. I didn't know that it would be removed when I went into surgery, so I was surprised when I went for my 2 week follow-up and the Dr. told me that I shouldn't play any court sports or prolonged running. I had already played in a pickup game of basketball before my 2 week appt. I was pole vaulting in college at the time as well. I was extremely active and young, so the thought of slowing things down was the furthest thing from my mind.

I tore my left medial meniscus when I was 26 and had it completely removed. I've been less than active in my late 20's and early 30's, but I've recently started running at the age of 34. Within the 3 weeks of running on the road my right knee is absolutely killing me and my left knee is sore as well. I came searching for anybody that had experience with this and I'm glad to find this thread. I have my first running event(6k)tomorrow morning and I'm determined to finish the race running. I just worry that it will be my last. I may have to take up race-walking to keep the impact lower but still allow me to get out on the road and get my heart rate up. I'll figure something out, but I wish I had some solid answers.

Thanks everyone for your input and experiences. It does help.

--Justin (Eugene, OR)

Jan 25, 2010
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bi-laterial meniscus removal
by: Jennie

I commend you for continuing to exercise. In late 2008, at the age of 34, I had over 50% of my meniscus removed from both my left and right knees. In my right knee there was additional damage that my doctor repaired as much as he could. My doctor told me that I wouldn't be able to run or do any type of hardcore mtn biking and/or high impact sports or I would run the risk of further damage of my knee.

In August of 2009 I signed up to run the Disney Marathon w/o any prior running exp. I began training and made sure that I either wrapped both of my knees or wore braces and stretched really well every time I trained. I found that wrapping my knees were more comfortable and stable then using any knee brace.

My knees felt better then they did in my early 20's playing soccer. I ran my first marathon a few weeks ago. I trained running on roads and I never had an issue. You can have your doctor do an MRI to see if there is any further damage done to your joints by continuing to exercise. They will do an Xray to determine arthritis. Arthritis I have found is unavoidable after having your meniscus removed. I have found that my knees will become painful right before a rainstorm and also in extremely cold temps.

Good luck with your training and your knee health!.

Feb 10, 2010
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second surgery
by: Anonymous

I am 26yrs old,i had my first surgery when i was 17 from a soccer engery.My acl was ripped and so was my meniscus,the doc repaired both and stiched up the meniscus and everything was good until now.I started getting swelling and pain in my right knee again so i went to the doc.i did an mri and the doc found that the reparied part of my meniscus had ripped into 4 sections,he told me that reparing it hardly ever works but sence i was so young they thought it might heal ok.so now ok go in 2 weeks to have it removed,i do heavy weightlifting and practice jiu-jitsu,doc said it shouldnt effect either and that squats were good for the knee,im 6ft 205lbs and he said i should be fine

Feb 21, 2010
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anecdotal evidence
by: TONYH

Interesting. I'm a 67 yrld been putting in 25 to 30 miles a week all my life. My first injury is a meniscus tear, just removed 45% couple days ago! It only makes sense that's going to have some further ramifications, given the structure involved.

Nonetheless, I personally know three guys in their 40's and 50's long distancing and in one case trail marathoning with partial removals. Also I've spent hours googling it out. I know I'm gonna try. Truth is, these injuries are just too idiosyncratic for general answers. But, think of it, you would want to shift strike away from the side of leg affected, shoes?

Feb 21, 2010
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15 year old partial meniscectomy
by: Anonymous

Hi,

I'm a very active 15 year old girl and last year I got injured playing soccer. I had 1/3 of my lateral meniscus removed. I know play with a brace, but not as often and I strength train twice a week. The doctor says I may need the brace my whole life if I wish to run. Do you think that's too conservative?

May 10, 2010
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Returning to running after a meniscus removal
by: Anonymous

I had surgery at 30 years ago to remove a torn meniscus. Several years ago, I started running, and getting fit. A few months later, I felt quite a bit of pain in my knee. I saw a very reputable sports orthopedic specialist who concluded that the side of my knee without the meniscus was collapsing. X-rays showed that my femur (the thigh bone) was making direct contact with the bones on my lower leg! Arthritis was definitely present too. They did some "clean up" surgery and told me that I would likely need more surgery later. Running is the worst thing I can do. Biking and swimming are better sports for me. Life without running isn't so bad. Sometimes when I stand, I can actually feel the bones touching. I absolutely trust the doctor when it comes to his advice about no running. I can tell there is no cushion in the joint and want to avoid the next operation as long as possible. Good luck with your decision, but if you are questioning this, I would definitely get other opinions from professionals who specialize in sports orthopedics.

May 10, 2010
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11 wks in from surgery
by: tony h

11 wks after having 50% removql of meniscus, I'm doing 20. The wear of marathon training may or may not be possible, but seems feasable now. Anyhow, this is good compared to 0. Slow, but that's always been me. I think total recovery to the point of long distance running is the rule rather than the exception. Most folks I know get back from partial removal pretty quick. I'm 67, as stated in first post, and this is my first injury save a bout of fasciitis 35 years since

Jul 21, 2010
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Leg & knee injury..
by: Webdes2008@gmail.com

Broke my leg 3 years ago, and some sort of knee injury.. wasnt told exactly what.. but did have arthoscopy and something else on the side of my knee.. 3 months after surgery couldnt extend my leg or bend my knee that much, and my knee pain has always been the same seems like a meniscus tear.. pain gets pretty bad upto an 8/9.. Can't take an MRI because i have metal plates in my leg now..

and i was curious if anyone had problems with extending their leg straight all the way/bending their knees and if their meniscus surgery actually helped??

Feb 13, 2011
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Lateral Meniscus Removal
by: Frank

At 17 years old, I had an ACL reconstruction and partial Lateral meniscus tear repaired of my left knee (HS football injury). I joined the military at 21 and became very active in terms or running, triathlons, and weight training. In addition, I completed all those crazy schools that give you badges but are high impact on your knees. Fast forward 14 years (35 yrs old) still in the military. The rigors on this active lifestyle has resulted in the removal of the lateral meniscus and micro fractures to remove some of the arthritis in the left knee. I saw a very experience & senior ortho doc who worked with the Baltimore ravens and he told me that my running days are over. To maintain my cardio I bike, swim, and alternate using the eliptical machine or the likes. I pressed my doc for a long term prognosis based on the level of activity/lifestyle I learned to enjoy and this is the best advice i can give to whoever reads this post. You actually can run but at a price. I run about 1-2 times a month anywhere from 3-4 miles. This will result in arthritis and eventually a knee replacement depending on your body (5-25 years down the road). I have children and if you define good quality of life as the activity you can enjoy with your family i would advise to stop running and do the alternate events to get your endorphines going. if exercise is your life then keep doing it and technology will eventually find a fix for bad knees and you can keep that level of activity you also learned to enjoy (bit of a gamble). When I found myself in hairy situations in Afghanistan, my left knee did not fail me as I was able to move with the best of them but I feel if I had overdid it early enough post surgery I might have had the same level of mobility. There are many alternate treatments and surgeries but they don't work for everybody. For the younger individuals who have similar injuries learn to incorporate weight training and that will reduce or slow down re-injury. As a disclaimer, your Ortho and physical therapist are the only ones that can give you a good prognosis your your particular injury. Also, Glucosemine worked really well for me...sucks to have to take two horse pills a day but I can tell the difference. Again, doesn't work for everybody.

Feb 23, 2011
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BAD REPORT
by: JJ

I AM 39. I HAD A LARGE PART OF MY MENISCUS ON MY RIGHT KNEE REMOVED.DOCTOR TOLD ME NO MORE HIGH IMPACT SPORTS OR EXERCISE. I HAVE BEEN ACTIVE MY WHOLE LIFE SO IT IS KIND OF HARD TO GIVE UP SPORTS. 5 MONTHS AFTER SURGERY I WENT TO HIT SOFTBALL WITH MY OLD TEAM ..RAN JUST A LITTLE.NOW MY SAME KNEE SEEMS TO BE BOTHERING ME ON AND OFF. IS THERE ANY HOPE OR AM I HEADED BACK UNDER THE KNIFE... 2-23-11


Feb 24, 2011
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very individual, but common sense applies
by: Anonymous

Had it done a year ago. I'm 68, 25-30 ms wk for 40 yrs. Ran good half 6 mos latter. Have some twinges. Basically, don't get those boneheads rubbing and start an arthtitic condition: there's nothing between them now, they're only being held apart by your muscles! The arthritic condition won't get better. I'm going to sub biking as much as poss at a 3-1 mile ratio to prolong the inevitable wearing down. Several friends who kept running head on are doing fine a decade after. 'course, they're kids in their 40's and 50's.

Mar 09, 2011
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what about stem cell therapy
by: Anonymous

I have always been very active and can't accept the hault I have come to a year after 75% left knee menicus removal. I seem pretty good for a while now I have this lump that is painful on the lateral side of the knee. Had an injection in the lump which helped for about two weeks. The injury was worker's comp but know they refuse to claim this is part of the injury. Never had problem with the knee before. Like most of everyone has mentioned exercise and doing things is vital for our heads and to keep positive. Any suggestions are welcomed.

Apr 23, 2011
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50 % of my meniscus was removed
by: soccer10

I've an ACL & Meniscus repaired,my Doctor used a cadaver graft,he told me it was the best choice for my case.
I'm kind worry cuz he needed to removed about 50% of medial meniscus.does anymore have been on the same situation? I am worry about arthritis problems on the future. Any one have experienced arthritis after parcial removed the meniscus? I'm 31 years old and former pro soccer player.I just dont see myself having to quite due the complications in the future.

Any one could help me on my question !!! thanks.

Jun 15, 2011
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Meniscus removal
by: Ken

Had a partial medial meniscus removal (60%) done September 2010. Am 64 years old and ran all my life 20 to 35 miles a week. I felt okay after six weeks and started running on a treadmill once or twice a week after 12 weeks. Tried outside but too much pain at the cavity. It has been down hill since week 20. Had to get cortizone for inflamation every three months. Don't think I will run again although biking is a good alternative and non impact aerobic machines are good. Walking is difficult so I had to rule that out as an alternative exercise. I am a Varus (bowlegged) so the medial side takes a beating walking or running and causes some pain on the lateral side and stretches the MCL which gets sore. Can't do any squats below 50 percent. Friends with similar surgeries but less mass removed (below 30 percent) have been able to return to running. Don't you a brace unless walking on a hard surface or uneven surface. I usually have to ice my knee two times a day. It is like caring for a child except you don't have to worry about diapers.

Jun 16, 2011
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Update Lateral Meniscus
by: Frank

Based on several post following my own, I inquired as to how much of my meniscus was removed from my knee; approximately 40-50%. I began running 3 1/2 miles once/twice a week 2 months ago and would have pain for 2 days after the run and discomfort for an additional day or so. I continue taking my glucosamine (1500mg), with chondroitin (800mg) & MSM (750mg) 2 pills a day and after a month of doing this, it seems to expedite the healing process. Additionally, I began taking Mega men Extreme pre-workout and 1000mg Alaskan fish oil from Costco and 1000mg of vitamin C per day a different time based on my schedule but usually after a meal. I cut down running to 3 1/3 miles bi-weekly but supplement with elliptical or stationary bicycle 25-30 minutes following my weight training workout. I workout my lower body intensely twice a week and my pain has almost completely disappeared (I built-up my knee's supporting cast). I begin with a warm-up, then squats (knees parallel to ground) never exceeding 185 pounds, inner/outer thighs machine, lunges w/ weights (leg extension hurt), leg curls (light weight high reps), good mornings, calves raises, etc...I alternate some other exercises (single leg squat) and whatever else I find in muscle and strength magazine/books. I have come to realize that if you want to maintain a high level of fitness or just athleticism it's vital to follow a regiment like the one I mentioned above both physically and supplementation. It sucks that pre-injury I didn't required working so hard to live pain free but it's the reality of my/our situation. Hope this chronicle helps somebody out and knows it's not going to get better over night but know that it can with the right type of focus/emphasis. Rule of thumb...if it hurts stop immediately and find an alternate!

Jun 17, 2011
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run at moderate speed, don't twist
by: Anonymous

I'm going on 70, run and have run 30 miles a week for 40 yrs. Many friends (long distance runners) have had medial partials and are unaffected (mine was 60% removed). I work on my feet all day and then putz on my small farm. The injury was caused by a twisting motion at the shop, not by "running" though no doubt my carteldge is thin many places by now.I have minimal consequences two yrs later EXCEPT WHEN PULLING WEEDS or otyherwise bracing and twisting the knee. Sports that can involve that are in my opinion going to destroy ypur knee. My life is very active at work and home and I try to remember the motion that is the problem and not do it. Running doesn't bother it much, not even my 30 miles. But remember, I'm no trainig dfor sprints. I believe if you comne out ok keep running medium in a straight line you can be ok for decades. There's now good evidence that some of that cartilage which was thought to be gone when gone does in fact regenerate. That tougher part left along the bone may thicken a bit to take up the slack. (Big news for the medical world, but since it doesn't involve their business model, it's seldom mentioned.)

Aug 30, 2011
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looking for support buddies
by: Name

I'm 31 and just had 50% of my medial meniscus removed and am concerned about my prognosis. I'd like to get some email addresses of people who would like to keep in contact to share our experiences. Preferably people of similar age and injury. If you'd like to then send me an email: janod11@gmail.com. Thanks and be well.

Sep 07, 2011
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Running
by: redpan

I am 40 years old and have ran since my early teens. When I was 38 I had 50% left medial removed and when I was 39 i had 50% right medial removed. Commonsense says if you remove the functional shock absorber from half of your knee then wear and tear will occur. I have trawled through medical literature (I am a nurse) and it is well described that running will accelerate arthritis in the context of a meniscectomy be partial or total. My ortho surgeon says some people cannot help themselves and need to run. So his advise was only run once a week on soft surfaces, wear good shoes, keep your weight down and dont waste your money on glucosamine, apparently there are well constructed studies that prove it has no effect unless arthritis is already present. After feeling down for a while I have thrown myself onto a bike, my knees have never felt so good.

Sep 13, 2011
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My experience
by: Graeme

I'm 40 at Christmas. 2 years ago I had a 60% left meniscus removal. I was advised to stop the marathons and half marathons I used to do regularly, cut down the weekly mileage (c25-35 p.w) and take up triathlons. First 3 months I didn't run at all as I kept on getting pain on the inside (medial) side of the knee when squatting. 5 months on the pain disappeared, just over night. Then I started gently running, first just for 1 mile at a time. Now 2 years on I can run without pain for 40 minutes. I'm so conscious of arthritis etc I never plan to exceed 4-6 miles a week and the temptation is to go for it and ramp up the mileage. It is hard to resist temptation. I've found reading peoples stories very helpful and supportive... thankyou. ...one day I'd love to do a 10k again ... but would that be brave or just stupid?

Sep 14, 2011
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Recovering after knee operation
by: Lucy

I feel for everyone who has commented on here. I have run three London marathons in the last 4years. I am from a running family. My mum is currently running just over 7.0 min milling and she is 56yeas of age. My dad Richard BLois was a marathon legend who ran 73 marathon and 20 londons in his life.

I twisted my knee while bend down on 13th may 2011. I am now recovering from a meniscus removal that was performed last week. I have not been told how much has been removed yet but have been advised not to run. Judging by everyone comments it's not liking very good. Running is my life, my families life and me and my sisters run in memory of my dad who passed away in may 2009. If anyone can give me more information on having more cartilage put into the knee joint or any suggestions to help running after please email me.

Oct 13, 2011
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16 yrs and still going strong
by: Josh

Hi all,
16 years ago I suffered the Unhappy Triad, and had my meniscus totally removed, acl and mcl repaired. all this was as a result of a rugby tackle.
I had extensive rehab thereafter but was told I would never be able to tackle serious sport. I did carry on being active thereafter and occasionally ran. 3 years ago the running bug bit really hard and I started running regularly. I would occasionally get swelling in the knee, tightness and a dull ache. over time I learnt that the most important thing is to strengthen the surrounding muscles. Another problem is that my left leg is now half an inch or so shorter, so I need to be conscious of that when using fixed weights or stretching on both legs.
Here's the good part: I have done over 2300 miles in the last 2 years, I have done 5 marathons, countless halves, 15ks and 10ks. I did the my First Two Oceans Ultra (56km) this year, and I am doing the double next year (Two Oceans 56k and Comrades 89km) to celebrate and health and happy 40th birthday.
Oh, and I am lean but genetically very heavy (195 pounds) so my legs carry quite a bit.
Anyone out there who wants to carry on enjoying running just needs to look after the knee by building muscle strength around it, and do try to shift to a forefoot strike.
Happy running!!
Josh Ogada
Cape Town


Oct 13, 2011
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To Lucy and others losing hope..
by: Josh

Lucy, and anyone else despairing about running, don't give up!!
feel free to drop me an email and I will be happy to share tips on how i've gotten through it so far. Running is too good to quit unless you absolutely have to - it is the best form of life therapy.
joshogada@gmail.com
Josh Ogada
Cape Town

Oct 18, 2011
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Right Complete Medial Meniscus Removal
by: P. Singh

Meniscus tear locked my R knee at the age of 21. Sports was my life, I was playing any and every sport I could. Surgeon completely removed the medial meniscus (other docs later questioned this).

After some very rough initial rehab that lasted several months, I continued playing tennis, squash, ball hockey etc. When I played I would always go all out. My knee was constantly in pain. One doc told me to take up swimming and golf. I was in my early 20s, it was not going to happen. I got referred to a doctor who was the doc for an NHL team. He was rude and abrupt. I was about to walk from his office. He got out a ruler and started measuring and prescribed orthotics. I thought he was a quack. The orthotics instantly changed my life with respect to the knee pain.

It's now 20 years later. I'm still wearing orthotics in my dress shoes and in my sports shoes. I still play ice hockey and ball hockey 2x/week. Sometimes i add soccer and tennis etc. My knee is mostly pain free. Maybe a few weeks every year it hurts. If I go upto 4x/wk it gets a bit much. But then again i don't have time to do that on a regular basis. Other injuries are starting to catch up and become more limiting than my knee. I'm waiting for my knee to fall apart, there is some arthritis.

A couple of other things I think really help, keeping weight down and light weight exercises specific to the muscles around both knees helps keeps things aligned and minimizes stress on knee.

Overall I consider it a huge success story. For me, orthotics, weight down, work out knee muscle, back off when pain.

Oct 18, 2011
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Running with 2 injured knees??
by: Katherine

I am 40 years old and only starting running about 3 years ago. I had a menicus tear in my left knee about 3 1/2 years ago, and had about 50% of my menicus removed. Then about a month ago, and had surgery on the right knee to have about 50% of that menicus removed as well. My surgeon told me that I have a large amount to arthritis in my right knee. He said that he usually only find this amount of arthritis in people over 60. He recomended that I stop running. I just completed my first half marathon earlier this year, and I really want to complete a full one. I am not sure if I should continue running. I don't want to injure myself again, however, I don't want to stop running either. HELP!

Oct 19, 2011
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second opinion
by: Anonymous

Yeah, the arthritis is the problem. That can only get worse so when it is present or beginning to worsen, that probably is a time to find another workout (Biking). The only treatment for arthritis is a knee replacement. I'd sure check another doc on the arthritis MRI or did he/she see it only while removing the meniscus? One physician told me to stop running after men surgery the other said don't cut back at all! But I had no arthritis.

Dec 23, 2011
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Worn out at 55 NEW
by: Anonymous

In my mid 20’s I had 80% of my lateral meniscus removed from my left knee. At that time I had been practicing martial arts for a few years. The injury that caused the tear was unrelated to my exercise regiment but was a result of a water skiing accident.

6-months ago I fell off the roof of my house about 12 feet. I landed square on my feet and of course my knees totally bent as I rolled out of the fall with no physical damage, or at least I thought at that time.

Within a month I started to experience pain in the inner area of my knee, exactly where the scar is from the surgery. Over the next few months, depending on activity, pain has increased sometimes to the point of needing a cane. For the most part the pain is manageable but will not go away. I still practice martial arts but have limited myself since the fall from my roof, to no severe shock to the left knee joint.

I am soon going to the doctor for my annual checkup and this situation will be discussed and as well tests will be run to determine the actual condition.

What I have read so far shows me that due to having very little lateral meniscus left in my knee, the impact from the fall obviously cracked or severely bruised the bones in the knee joint in this area. For the past 30-years there were no indicators of arthritis or any negative conditions from the initial OP procedure. I attribute that absolutely no problems from the surgery after 30-years to continuing my exercising and practicing marital arts. Keep moving, keep exercising but use common sense. If it hurts your body is telling you something is wrong, stop and figure out why it hurts, and then fix it if you can, but keep moving.

Aug 07, 2012
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70% Lateral Meniscectomy on right knee NEW
by: WSmith

This is a really interesting thread and I hope that others respond. Four years ago, I sustained an injury which resulted in a 70% meniscectomy of the lateral meniscus in my right knee. The injury took place during a Martial Arts class, but in hindsight, multiple other injuries from high school football, snowboarding and skiing also contributed.

I had basically sworn off running due to the fear of arthritis, but have since decided to train for a sprint triathlon. My wife is an avid runner and I enjoy running with her. I have been taking it very slow and paying attention to signals from my joints. So far, so good.

I'm curious as to whether anyone has tried prolotherapy. It seems to be a bit on the fringes from the standpoint of the medical community, but stem cell prolotherapy seems to make sense. The cost is still high, but delaying arthritis is worth it in my mind.

Oct 25, 2012
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Partial Meniscus NEW
by: Ash

I have also had a partial meniscus removed from my inner Right knee, about 25%. I actually suffered more than a year with excruciating pain before but X'ray did not show much and my physician thought it was a knee degeneration since I was already 48 and slightly overweight. Anyway since pain was fluctuating day by day from minor to serious, I decided to do a MRI where we found it was a torn partial meniscus stuck to a nerve. Now 3 months after surgery, my pain is much less but I still have pain. It is a different pain running right on the knee (vs previously on the inner side) and pain is a nerve (sharp) pain when walking. Again, it goes from day to day but if I massage that nerve, it seems better for a while.
Will this pain ever go and what should I do to get the pain out sooner. I now go indoor cycling twice a week and am afraid to go further due to that nerve pain

Oct 25, 2012
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Partial Meniscus NEW
by: Ash

I have also had a partial meniscus removed from my inner Right knee, about 25%. I actually suffered more than a year with excruciating pain before but X'ray did not show much and my physician thought it was a knee degeneration since I was already 48 and slightly overweight. Anyway since pain was fluctuating day by day from minor to serious, I decided to do a MRI where we found it was a torn partial meniscus stuck to a nerve. Now 3 months after surgery, my pain is much less but I still have pain. It is a different pain running right on the knee (vs previously on the inner side) and pain is a nerve (sharp) pain when walking. Again, it goes from day to day but if I massage that nerve, it seems better for a while.
Will this pain ever go and what should I do to get the pain out sooner. I now go indoor cycling twice a week and am afraid to go further due to that nerve pain

Nov 06, 2012
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Running after meniscus surgery NEW
by: Anonymous

Today I had 2/3 of my left medial meniscus removed. i am 56 female runner, been running 35 yrs, through 4 pregnancies, 3 cancer diagnosis. Running has kept me fit, healthy and happy. the scope revealed arthritis and a small injury to articular cartilage which the surgeon derided and smoothed. I've never had a problem with my knees until this injury which I managed to sustain whilst sitting down! The presence of arthritis and a recommendation to stop running have been upsetting. Have read with great interest all the comments posted. I intend to be very careful with my rehab, be patient and attempt to try running again when I've healed. Was doing 25/30 miles x 3 times a week plus x3 gym sessios. Accept I may need to cut back. A life without running is unthinkable to me.
Good luck to all.

Dec 24, 2012
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tough to stop running, but... NEW
by: Anonymous

Hello all, I am glad to see this post is still up and running (pun intended!). I had most of my meniscus removed in my left knee while having surgery from a torn ACL. I tore both tendons while playing 'flag football'...popular here in the States. I am a thin, fit female who has utlized running my whole life (I'm 40 now) to stay in shape and keep the stress of life at a minimum. I ran track in high school & college and continued to run consistently all my life. It is REALLY hard to stop running. I still run with my dog twice a week (about 3-4 miles each time) and it is often on pavement (yikes!). My knee aches if I push it too much...and I am 2 years out from the surgery.
Similar to other posts... I did find cycling and it is great for the knee! I am not going to lie and say its the same as running (psychologically)...but it is the best thing I've found so far. Also, doing yoga once a week really helps the flexibility and strength for knees and overall.
Good luck to everyone going through these lifestyle changes...and post your success stories!

Dec 24, 2012
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tough to stop running, but... NEW
by: Anonymous

Hello all, I am glad to see this post is still up and running (pun intended!). I had most of my meniscus removed in my left knee while having surgery from a torn ACL. I tore both tendons while playing 'flag football'...popular here in the States. I am a thin, fit female who has utlized running my whole life (I'm 40 now) to stay in shape and keep the stress of life at a minimum. I ran track in high school & college and continued to run consistently all my life. It is REALLY hard to stop running. I still run with my dog twice a week (about 3-4 miles each time) and it is often on pavement (yikes!). My knee aches if I push it too much...and I am 2 years out from the surgery.
Similar to other posts... I did find cycling and it is great for the knee! I am not going to lie and say its the same as running (psychologically)...but it is the best thing I've found so far. Also, doing yoga once a week really helps the flexibility and strength for knees and overall.
Good luck to everyone going through these lifestyle changes...and post your success stories!

Dec 24, 2012
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tough to stop running, but... NEW
by: Anonymous

Hello all, I am glad to see this post is still up and running (pun intended!). I had most of my meniscus removed in my left knee while having surgery from a torn ACL. I tore both tendons while playing 'flag football'...popular here in the States. I am a thin, fit female who has utlized running my whole life (I'm 40 now) to stay in shape and keep the stress of life at a minimum. I ran track in high school & college and continued to run consistently all my life. It is REALLY hard to stop running. I still run with my dog twice a week (about 3-4 miles each time) and it is often on pavement (yikes!). My knee aches if I push it too much...and I am 2 years out from the surgery.
Similar to other posts... I did find cycling and it is great for the knee! I am not going to lie and say its the same as running (psychologically)...but it is the best thing I've found so far. Also, doing yoga once a week really helps the flexibility and strength for knees and overall.
Good luck to everyone going through these lifestyle changes...and post your success stories!

Dec 24, 2012
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tough to stop running, but... NEW
by: Anonymous

Hello all, I am glad to see this post is still up and running (pun intended!). I had most of my meniscus removed in my left knee while having surgery from a torn ACL. I tore both tendons while playing 'flag football'...popular here in the States. I am a thin, fit female who has utlized running my whole life (I'm 40 now) to stay in shape and keep the stress of life at a minimum. I ran track in high school & college and continued to run consistently all my life. It is REALLY hard to stop running. I still run with my dog twice a week (about 3-4 miles each time) and it is often on pavement (yikes!). My knee aches if I push it too much...and I am 2 years out from the surgery.
Similar to other posts... I did find cycling and it is great for the knee! I am not going to lie and say its the same as running (psychologically)...but it is the best thing I've found so far. Also, doing yoga once a week really helps the flexibility and strength for knees and overall.
Good luck to everyone going through these lifestyle changes...and post your success stories!

Jan 07, 2013
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Partial meniscus removal NEW
by: Matt elson

Hi I'm matt and I'm only 15

I had my surgery last year on the 27th of November, my meniscus wasntbin the right state to be repaired therefore it was removed. I'm an extremely fit youngster that played football everyday of the week, I'm extremely skilful and I'm the best on the team, (I don't like to think that but that's what others say) I was so scared of this operation that I wouldnt go to sleep at all and it would ultimately affect my emotions dying the day and put me in a bad mood. Now after the surgery, my personality has changed, because I'm not use to going out playing this wonderful sport nearly every day, I often cry before going to sleep because my childhood dream of becoming a professional football has come to a halt and my hopes of reaching that ambition I have worked hard for has ruined everything around me, my relationship with friends have gone down hill, my attitude completely changes when I dot play this sport. So far, I have played around 6 hours of football and it's like I haven't played for Years and I hav felt no pain at all I can still run at full pace (12 seconds in 100m ) and Im easily fit for players that are 3 or 4 years older than me and and it feels natural.

Ultimately, all I care about right now getting my career started and taking something from football as it took something special from me.

I am hopeful for good feedback :) and not bad :/

Jan 19, 2013
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Meniscus removal NEW
by: Reena

Hi, I am a 25 year old female. I'm so happy when I found this site and reading all your stories. When I was 20, I had my ACL torn due to volleyball.. And last year I had my meniscus torn in my left knee due to volleyball also..after the operation I continued playing volleyball again cause I just can't stop doing something that I loved and good at. Now, I'm currently in my hospital bed cause I torn my repaired meniscus again. The doctor told me that it can't be repaired anymore. So it has to be remove. I'll be having my surgery on Monday. I feel really devastated because the doctor told me I have to limit all my activities after this and I might suffer arthritis in the future. I read that cycling is good for athletes with meniscus removal, is it true? Won't it just increase the chance of having arthritis sooner? Please give me some feedback.. Thank you!

Jan 19, 2013
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biking as therapy NEW
by: Tony

I'm the guy who's 70, life long runner and has posted earlier. I've got a nice racing bike but don't need to use it often. The theory is that strengthening the tendons and muscles in the knee, you are keeping the heads of the bones apart. I did run about 30= miles per week before the 70% removal, but for the last 2= yrs have been running only 20+. That's due to work, etc - where, by the way the original injury occured - NOT running! It is noticeable sometimes, last few weeks, for instance, but seems to not be related to running at all. From my half dozen friends who have had this operation, I'd say don't be pessimistic. It seems to be VERY case specific. One thing all my friends say is stay thin.

Feb 28, 2013
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Full Medial Meniscus Tear/Removal NEW
by: Kyle

Hey everyone, I'm both disheartened and encouraged by this thread. I'm 24 and tore my ACL and meniscus in a wrestling accident. Although I enjoy running some for exercise, I don't consider myself a "runner". I have surgery scheduled, and the doc doesn't know how much of the meniscus will have to be removed. It will definitely be some, but perhaps all. I won't know til I wake up out of the anesthesia.

My fears aren't so much about not being able to run, but about being able to work to provide for my family, and do some recreational things I love like mountain hiking and skiing. I hope to be able to do these with my children and grand-children. Tony, your posts are very encouraging so thank you so much. It's so good to know that you still work on your farm and run a bit.

Has anyone done any extensive hiking or skiing 15-30 years after medial (inner) meniscus removal? How about physical labor like home repair or building? I plan on skiing with snow blades, the mini-skis that are easier to control.

Feb 28, 2013
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Stay strong NEW
by: Graeme

I last posted here back in Sept 2011 and am glad to say I'm really encouraged by all the contributors here. I've learned that by sharing experienced you become stronger. We all need to share more often! My heart goes out to all of us. Personally 18 months on I still don't run much but have found triathlons, swimming cycling and the occasional 5k run is really fun to train for. I've also learnt to strengthen the knee as this seems to help absorb impact.

Stay strong.


Mar 21, 2013
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80% MENISCUS REMOVED NEW
by: Rob

Hello

I'm 35 5'11 and 75kg

I had a bucket handle tear in my meniscus and had 80% of it removed last Friday. The surgeon said no more football or running for me :-(

At the moment I'm walking very slowly and still in pain, mainly waiting for the swelling to properly go down

I just wondered how long it took anyone before you could walk properly again. I guess cycling and swimming are going to have to be my new sports of choice

Any feedback would be great

Mar 21, 2013
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Returning to activity NEW
by: Frank

Post surgery I recommend taking it easy and working only on flexibility for six weeks. Afterwards start with biking and swimming...after 2 months of strenghthening your quads you can finally start with the elipticle. You can try running at that point but it will feel weird and for 3-4 days following your run you will be sore and may start feeling some discomfort from the arthritis. Hope this helps.

Aug 08, 2013
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1 Week Postop NEW
by:

Just have 75% of meniscus removed from right knee. Sounds like no running ever again. Played soccer all my life and hoping to get some in at a recreational level. Maybe start a new sport called walking-soccer. Sort of like trotters in horse racing. :) Time will tell.

Aug 15, 2013
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There is indeed life... AND runinng after meniscus removal NEW
by: Anonymous

I had 80% of my medial meniscus removed back after a horrific rugby injury in my early 20s. It took a long time to rehab and build strength in my quads. But I am happy to say that at the age of 41, I am a happy ultra-marathon runner. I currently average 40 miles a week, which goes up in peak training. You have to be patient with your rehab, and when you get back into running, i'd highly recommend transition to a minimalist shoe so that you stop heel-striking... this will make for happy knees.
Chin up to you all and good luck!!
Josh Ogada
joshogada@gmail.com

Aug 15, 2013
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There is indeed life... AND runinng after meniscus removal NEW
by: josh

I had 80% of my medial meniscus removed back after a horrific rugby injury in my early 20s. It took a long time to rehab and build strength in my quads. But I am happy to say that at the age of 41, I am a happy ultra-marathon runner. I currently average 40 miles a week, which goes up in peak training. You have to be patient with your rehab, and when you get back into running, i'd highly recommend transition to a minimalist shoe so that you stop heel-striking... this will make for happy knees.
Chin up to you all and good luck!!
Josh Ogada
joshogada@gmail.com

Sep 09, 2013
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Lateral Partial meniscectomy NEW
by: Anonymous

Hi all. I was a professional basketball player and suffered a lateral meniscus tear whilst playing in Italy 3 years ago. I had a significant portion of lateral meniscus removed via a partial menisectomy.

I have attempted to perform several come-backs, my legs are strong, I lost a lot of weight but the rigors of high intensity practice just lead to lateral swelling and instability. Think I'm going to hang up the boots once and for all. Tom

Sep 10, 2013
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update NEW
by: Frank

Tom, I posted several times so won't repeat that info but I have started training jiu jitsu intensly and while I have no lateral meniscus on my left knee, it doesn't bother me whatsoever. Several MMA fighters are able to compete at the highest levels with the same injury. They get their cardio through bike, swimmimg, the hand bike and sparring....just a thought to consider.

Josh I asked my ortho reference your level of activity and he stated that the lateral meniscus absorbs 60-70% of impact to the knee so a medial meniscus injury isn't as debilitating. I say this because I follow all medical advice, weight loss, shoes, exercise and supplementation and my knee at 37 cannot take the high intensity training you described pain free...it will only expedite a knee replacement.

Thank everybody for their inputs it has been very helpful for me.

Frank

Sep 20, 2013
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60% meniscus removal in right knee NEW
by: rob

Hi Mark and others, I hurt my knee 10 years ago when I slipped on a squash court causing my knee to bend under me. I had physio and a month later was running again no problem for 5 years. Then I aggravated it again but i continued running again for 5 years 4 sessions (total 50km) per week. I only really felt pain if i pressed on the area on the inside of the knee but it was always there. Recently I was running down a steep hill and felt a "tear" in the knee. I had to walk home. MRI confirmed a parrot tear. I had the surgery yesterday and 60% on meniscus removed. I am 50 years old and have been a runner all my life.

I used a top knee surgeon, and this morning day after the op I have no pain! He wants me to only (spin) on the bike for my rehab and run / walk on soft surfaces after 6- 8 weeks. I want to run into my 70's and will err on the side of caution during my comeback. Although I would love to run long distance I think that if I can just run my 30-45 min run on a daily basis pain free i will be over the moon. Will keep you posted on progress

May 01, 2014
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60% removed after failed repair NEW
by: Kelly

What a great thread... I think. I just had 60% of my left medial meniscus removed (yesterday, as a matter of fact) after the attempted repair did not work (5.5 months ago.) Whether it was bad luck on the healing or I did something to it when I bent into a 140 degree bend after my foot got jammed on a padded cushion at the end of a water slide at 10 weeks post op, we don't know for sure. Obviously that little incident didn't help. Anyhow.. it took me a while, but I got back to close to full ROM (couldn't do a few things, like child's pose in yoga) or a full squat to tie my kids shoe laces without kicking my leg out) but strengthening exercises helped. At 33 years old and being very active, I finally decided that being at a constant 2/3 pain and occasionally higher after a long walk or hike (I ran my last run and race about 3 months before the first surgery) was something I wanted to address. Since the doc had only used 2 sutures with the first repair, I had expected less than 30% removal and was heartbroken to hear that a 60% loss was the result . I had already determined that running was out, and aside from being able to chase my kids around, I'm okay with that. I am encouraged to see that cycling is such a good option. Ironically, as my running days came to a slow-down, my husbands started up. I am glad to know that at least the family can go on bike rides along with him when he runs on select trails.
I have no idea what is in store for me with the recovery, but I am trying to stay positive and am grateful I spent the last 2 months working on quad and hamstrings!

Jun 03, 2014
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Medial tear eight months ago NEW
by: Peter

As a regular runner for the last 10 years (started running at age 50) I like reading these largely running-related posts.
My history: Eight months ago suffered a moderately sized complex tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (left leg) extending across the inner,middle and outer sections with a radial component and a full thickness tear component.

At 6 months and an eventual MRI which confirmed a meniscal tear I decided to cease running completely and concentrate on walking for exercise with the aim of being able to briskly walk 10 kilometres per day without pain for seven consecutive days.

Ceasing running (temporarily I plan) certainly helped in the recovery process. I must stress that a surgeon has not as yet come within cooee of the knee. I plan to keep it that way.

Back to the walking regime: it seems to be progressing nicely. I can walk three consecutive days at 10km per day without any significant or lasting knee pain. I need to have a day or two leg rest at this point then I seem good to go and can start from day one again.

There seem to be so many variables - an almost infinite tear pattern, related injuries etc - that I like to think of a meniscal tear as an experiment of one.

I look forward to reaching that seventh day of consecutive walking. Then I can start tapering back to my true passion: regular running.


Sep 22, 2014
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Partial Lateral Meniscectomy NEW
by: Anonymous

Hi all. I was a professional athlete playing basketball in Italy when I suffered a lateral meniscus tear at 29 years old. I had an MRI and surgery the very next day, a good portion of my lateral meniscus was removed. My recovery was slow and I was forced to return home.

I then had another scope in the UK, no more meniscus was removed but the knee was 'cleaned up' which improved things a little.

I tried to return to professional sport but have been unable to play/practice more than once per week without quite severe swelling & instability. I'm now 32, 3 years on from surgery & can just about manage about 1 hour's basketball per week at a recreational level.

In an attempt to return to professional sport I was extremely lean and legs were strong but despite this, there just wasn't enough meniscus left to provide adequate support.

Day to day activity is fine and controlled exercise such as squats etc. do not cause any issues. I am fine unless I push it too far. As far as I know there are no other procedures which would allow a return to sport so it's just something I've had to deal with.


Sep 22, 2014
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Running with a meniscal tear, no surgery NEW
by: Peter

This is an update from my June 03 2014 post.
So here in Melbourne Australia things are coming along nicely. I have progressed to running between 60 and 90 kilometres per week for the last ten weeks without any real knee issues. No regular speed training, almost all steady aerobic distance running since marathons are my passion at the ripe age of 60, an age which seems to thin the ranks of runners.
I still have no expectations of taking the orthopedic knife route.
The tear I have seems to be the stable variety.
Extreme flexion under load, as in crouching suddenly, is questionable at this stage. However I don't plan on crouching and running at the same time.

I suppose the tear could get worse but if that's the way the cookie crumbles then I will deal with it when/if this occurs.

Nov 17, 2014
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bucket handle meniscal resection and acl recon NEW
by: Cheryl

This is a great thread and shows how variable our experiences are dependent on age, injury, general health, rehab etc... I have read quite a bit pre and post op and have gathered that you can't rush the process and you must be patient and work to your own body's reactions. I am recovering from a right acl recon and right meniscal bucket handle tear which was resected ( not sure how much yet). My plan us to follow my physiotherapy and work up slowly with strengthening exercises working inline with physio guidelines. I don't think it's worth risking running too early as it takes 4 months or so for the acl graft to bed in and as previous comments have said, the meniscal resection will no doubt compromise the health of my knee joint. I am tempted to look at bracing my knee and I hear that there is a brand of shoe called a Hoka that is very good for cushioning. My plan re running is to work up to 5k on the treadmill and prob stick to park run and maybe 10k at some point. Good luck everyone .

Nov 17, 2014
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bucket handle meniscal resection and acl recon NEW
by: Cheryl

This is a great thread and shows how variable our experiences are dependent on age, injury, general health, rehab etc... I have read quite a bit pre and post op and have gathered that you can't rush the process and you must be patient and work to your own body's reactions. I am recovering from a right acl recon and right meniscal bucket handle tear which was resected ( not sure how much yet). My plan us to follow my physiotherapy and work up slowly with strengthening exercises working inline with physio guidelines. I don't think it's worth risking running too early as it takes 4 months or so for the acl graft to bed in and as previous comments have said, the meniscal resection will no doubt compromise the health of my knee joint. I am tempted to look at bracing my knee and I hear that there is a brand of shoe called a Hoka that is very good for cushioning. My plan re running is to work up to 5k on the treadmill and prob stick to park run and maybe 10k at some point. Good luck everyone .

Apr 07, 2015
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Second Surgery Same Knee NEW
by: Surgery2

Hi,

I have been reading these comments hoping to find some magic answer or hope for the future.

I am female and I have had two surgeries on my right knee. The first was in December 2007, I was about 20. I had my meniscus repaired and a cadaver ACL replacement. I was fine until October of 2014 when I crouched down and my knee gave out and started swelling. When the report for the MRI came back, I had a bucket handle tear. It was compared to the earlier report from the '07 surgery and it looked like it might have been the same tear. The Dr. said that repairing a repair job that failed doesn't work so we arranged to remove it.

I had the second surgery on my right knee in Feb of 2015 to remove part of my meniscus. They told me last week that 1/3 was removed, it was shredded, but my cartridge and my cadaver ACL looked fine. It is 4 weeks out from surgery and I am worried about my future levels of physical activity. These include, running, dancing, light sports, etc. Right now I can walk, do stairs, crouch, and fully extend. Walking for longer then 8-10 min or waking fast does hurt. As of now it still makes wet grinding noises when bending in certain directions. I would like to know if anyone has had 1/3 removed and how their physical activity was changed. I will try to post an update in a couple months as to what I am able to do. Best of luck.

Apr 07, 2015
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Surgery 2 NEW
by: Anonymous

The success of a 30 percent removal is excellent as long as you rehab properly.. A strong lower thigh muscle and hamstrings are integral to keeping the joint operatng properly. Nutritional supplements to lubricate the joint are helpful and eventually something like supartz or its equivalent may be necessary to protect the bone cartiledge. Each persons recovery is different depending on their knee alignment whether varus or valgus. A neutral foot displacement is best for long term recovery. RICE therapy should be used if you experience joint swelling or deep fluid in the joint. A little fluid can cause long term muscle, ligament and tendon pain and inflamation due to overuse. Ice rest compression and elevation with use of a non steriod anti inflamatory can help ease the pain and inflammation.

Jul 16, 2015
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relapsing meniscal pain NEW
by: Anonymous

Hi,
I'm very worried. I used to run a lot in my life. I'm 46 years old now. A couple of years ago I started mixed martial arts. I tore my left medial meniscus. I had left partial medial meniscectomy in january 2014. I started back my usual routine-MMA, some running, hot yoga and hiking. It was going great. I started to have meniscal pain in the right knee and I felt it catching on several occasions. It turned out I had damaged my right one and just had right medial meniscectomy couple of days ago. The doctor said no more running for me. It sucks but I'm OK with it. What worries me though is that for the past 3 weeks I stated reexperiencing pain in the left knee again and am worried about arthritis. I'm wondering if it's because of over compensating after finding out about my latest meniscal tear and me trying to protect it but I don't know what to do. I hope it's not arthritic pain because I want to still be able to hike and stay active even if I don't run. Anybody has any suggestions? I'm very depressed because of that.

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